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The Sanatoga Post has moved, but it’s not far … we promise. Your news resource for Lower Pottsgrove (PA) Township, the Pottsgrove School District, and Pottstown and Limerick PA relocated on Nov. 15, 2010, to a new internet address at sanatogapost.com. The enhanced edition at the new site offers many extra features. This current site remains as an archive for almost 3,000 articles published between August 2008 and November 2010. Please set your bookmarks for sanatogapost.com, and thanks for reading The Post!

POTTSTOWN PA – The 422plus Project, a team of planners and transportation experts studying the future of the U.S. Route 422 highway corridor between King of Prussia and Reading PA, released a series of videos Monday (Nov. 8, 2010) that attempt to answer frequently asked questions about the team’s work, 422 congestion, its effects on business and quality of life issues, and the possibility of tolling to raise money for its improvement.

An image from the first of four videos posted Monday at the 422plus Project website.

The first and last of the four videos feature representatives of the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission, which is the lead agency behind the study, as well as planning spokespersons for Montgomery, Chester and Berks counties.

Others interviewed include Kent Smith, director of the John Middleton Co. in Limerick PA; Steve Tullman, chief executive officer of Phoenixville Hospital; Sue Padilla, president of S&H Interiorscapes in Oaks PA; and several area residents, all identified by name and municipality, whose comments about 422 were filmed at the Providence Town Center shopping complex in Collegeville PA.

All of the videos are less than 2 minutes in length, and can be found here:

Related (to U.S. Route 422 Corridor planning):

Video image from the 422plus Project

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Ian Brennan, left, Andrew Grant, and Arizona Brennan make their food drive appeals Saturday outside Redner's Warehouse Market in Lower Pottsgrove.

POTTSTOWN PA – Ian Brennan, a Pottsgrove High School junior, and his friend at Spring-Ford High School, Andrew Grant, took time during the summer to attend a teen camp promoting volunteerism and leadership. Just a few months later, they and Brennan’s family members have put into action what the two learned about giving back to their communities.

Brennan, Grant, Brennan’s sister Arizona, other friends, and his parents, Michael and Elysia, were busy Saturday and Sunday (Nov. 6 and 7, 2010) soliciting food donations from shoppers at Redner’s Warehouse Market, Charlotte Street, Pottstown PA, to benefit the emergency food pantry of the Pottstown Cluster of Religious Communities. Both the store’s management and its customers were overwhelmingly supportive, Brennan said, as were other grocers and neighbors he’s contacted in recent weeks.

As a result, Elysia Brennan reported Monday (Nov. 8) by e-mail, Ian on Friday (Nov 12) will begin delivering more than 2,400 canned goods and other food items to the cluster’s doors at 137 Walnut St., Pottstown.

Ian and the cluster already had a good working relationship. The charitable organization is serving as the site of his senior project; he’s building a computer database to help the group work more efficiently.

Ian Brennan talks with a donor as his parents, at right, organize Redner's shoppers' contributions in a nearby cart.

While there, though, he couldn’t help but notice a growing need for food items, and heard of government cuts in the funding often used to buy that food. “I thought I could do something to help,” he said. That’s when he enlisted Andrew, and the two began their food drive.

Donations are constantly being accepted at the cluster, which is among Pottstown’s busiest sites for providing help to families with emergency needs. See a list of items it’s seeking, both for the pantry and its clothes closet, here.

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WEST POTTSGROVE PA – Volunteers from both Lower Pottsgrove (PA) Township fire companies, Sanatoga and Ringing Hill, were among those from 97 agencies across Montgomery, Berks and Chester counties called in Monday to fight a stubborn fire in a plastics recycling facility that occupied a building on the Universal Concrete campus at 400 Old Reading Pike in West Pottsgrove.

It took more than five hours to get the blaze, from which heavy black and gray smoke could be seen billowing most of the day, under control.

Details on the story were being made available by Philadelphia television station WPVI, and The (Pottstown PA) Mercury newspaper, here:

Photo from Clipart.com

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Judge Fehling talks Monday with an audience member at MCCC in Pottstown.

POTTSTOWN PA – If you want the best advice on how to capably manage credit, talk to a man who deals monthly with dozens of individuals whose credit is so flawed that they must file for bankruptcy.

That was the idea Monday night (Nov. 8, 2010), when Montgomery County Community College presented Judge Richard E. “Rick” Fehling, U.S. Bankruptcy Judge for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, as its featured speaker during a free credit awareness workshop in the community room of the college’s West Campus, 101 College Dr., Pottstown PA.

Before a small but enthusiastic audience, Fehling doffed his sport coat, rolled up his shirt-sleeves and discussed the good, the bad, and the ugly of credit card use, credit score repair, and the pleasures and problems that accompany impulse purchases. He told personal stories of his own spending and payments habits, and discussed why they worked … or didn’t. His candor seemed to put listeners at ease in relating their own credit concerns.

Apparently, those concerns are mounting. Bankruptcy cases filed in federal courts across the country for the fiscal year ending Sept. 30 (2010) were up 13.8 percent over the previous year, according to the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts. In Pennsylvania’s Eastern District alone – where Fehling hears cases – there were more than 15,000 filings during the 12-month period, or about 1,200 each month.

Bankruptcy is a legal process in which consumers and businesses can eliminate or repay some or all of their debts under court protection. Although the indebtedness may be wiped away over time, a bankruptcy filing can damage an individual’s ability to borrow money in the future, as well as affect their ability to get a job or qualify for certain assistance programs.

It’s better, and usually easier, to get and keep a good credit record than to patch up poor credit management with a bankruptcy, Fehling said.

  • The Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts has produced a series of nine videos, ranging from 1-1/2 minutes to 5 minutes in length, to explain bankruptcy in detail. Find them here, or by clicking on the video image above..

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Former school board member Robert Lindgren, now serving with the military in Afghanistan, will call fifth graders Thursday.

STOWE PA – Former Pottsgrove School District director Robert Lindgren, who in April (2010) resigned his position to voluntarily serve with the U.S. military in Afghanistan, will be interviewed during a video conference next week by fifth grade students in the district’s West Pottsgrove Elementary School.

Students in teacher Wendy Hasara’s classroom will talk on Veterans’ Day (Thursday, Nov. 11, 2010) with Lindgren via Skype video conference software from a facility in Herat, Afghanistan. The half-hour connection is scheduled for noon, district spokeswoman Beth Trapani said Monday (Nov. 8).

Talking with Lindgren is intended to give the fifth graders “a better appreciation for what the troops do and what it’s like to serve overseas,” Trapani said.

Alicia King, a student teacher from Valley Forge Christian College in Phoenixville PA who is assisting at West Pottsgrove, suggested the video conference. Lindgren’s wife, Kim, who is a district employee in its Technology Department and administrative office, helped to coordinate it.

They paid how much?

They paid how much?

POTTSTOWN PA – None of the real estate sales within Lower Pottsgrove (PA) Township from May 10 -July 23, 2010, commanded a high-enough price to be listed Sunday (Nov. 7, 2010) among top-selling properties reported by the Philadelphia Inquirer newspaper. Real estate among the township’s municipal neighbors made the grade, though.

This week’s top reported prices were listed in “The Top 50,” the newspaper’s weekly review of highest prices paid for real estate sold within the city of Philadelphia and townships in its surrounding counties.

During the same period, the top real estate sales price in Pottstown PA Borough, immediately to the west was $140,000; Limerick PA Township, east, $450,000; New Hanover PA Township, northeast, $170,000; Upper Pottsgrove PA Township, west, none listed; and in North Coventry PA Township, south, $335,000.

Across all of Montgomery County, the highest-priced property sold during the period went for $3,100,000, at 1221 Ridgewood Rd., Lower Merion PA.

Related:

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